Social Care Centers

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A lot of what schools do today is babysit while parents are working or otherwise engaged. What if we separated out that function from academic schooling and provided 24/7 public child care? While we're at institution building, let's include care for limited ability and aged folks as well -- anyone who can't be left on their own at home or in the community. The staff in care facilities would not be charged with "teaching", only providing the best possible social environment for their charges.
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Yes, this would be expensive. But we're brainstorming first and becoming practical a little later. We may find that significant savings can be realized by removing students from the classroom who are not interested in the academic program offered during the traditional school day. Beside, this is not a compulsory program. Some parents will choose to care for their children at home or with relatives and friends. Those who can afford it can pay a fee.
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The second responsibility of the care facility is to help their patrons keep appointments. These might be for on-campus classes, private lessons, sports, field trips or distance learning meetings. All care facilities would need to have enough connectivity and computer workstations so that they could meet their charges' demand for on-line teaching -- whether programmed or teacher-coach-facilitator led.

The third Social Care charter centers on socialization of its young charges. Some families can and choose to remain responsible for the care of their children full time until the children are independent enough to be unsupervised in the community or at home. Families that take advantage of Social Care Centers for long periods of time will need to rely on the staff to instill values and behaviors that are acceptable in communal community, educative, and work settings.


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References:


The following list of references is lifted from

Carbonaro, William, “Socializing Students: Do Early School Experiences Matter?” Paper presented at the
Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association, Philadelphia: August 2005 (on the web, Oct. 13, 2009).. ,. and might prove helpful to developing the concepts in this part of the educative puzzle.

Anyon, Jean. 1980. “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work.” Journal of Education 162:67-92.

Bidwell, Charles. 1965. ““The School as a Formal Organization.” Pp.972-1022 in The Handbook of Organizations. James March, Ed. Chicago: Rand McNally.

Bowles, Samuel and Herbert Gintis. 1976. Schooling in Capitalist America. New York: Basic Books, Inc.

Brint, Steven. 1998. Schools and Societies. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.

Brint, Steven, Mary Contreras, and Michael Matthews. 2001. “Socialization Messages in Primary Schools: An Organizational Analysis.” Sociology of Education 74:157-180.

Dreeben, Robert. 1968. On What is Learned in School. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Durkheim, Emile. 1956. Education and Society. Glencoe, IL: Free Press.

Holsinger, Donald. 1974. “The Elementary School as Modernizer: A Brazilian Study.” International Journal of Comparative Sociology 19:180-202.

Jackson, Phillip. 1968. Life in Classrooms. New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Parson, Talcott. 1959. “The School Class as a Social System: Some of its Functions in American Society.” Harvard Education Review 29:297-313.



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